Your Weird Friend.

I hope that by you perusing through my little ol' blog you will find a little bit of happiness, sadness, and things to
learn from.

Human beings do not grow in perfect symmetry. They oscillate, expand, contract, back track, arrest themselves, retrogress, mobilize, atrophy in part, proceed erratically according to experience and traumas. Some aspects of the personality mature, others do not. Some live in the past, some in the present. Some people are futuristic characters, some are cubistic, some are hard-edged, some geometric, some abstract, some impressionistic, some surrealistic! Some of their insights remain relative, and we can no longer think of a character as good or bad, but a combination of characteristics which vary according to relationship and the point in time. We know now that we are composites in reality, collages of our fathers and mothers, of what we read, of television influences and films, of friends and associates, and we know we often play roles quite removed from our genuine selves.

Anaïs Nin, from The Novel of the Future. (via meganmcisaac)

(via madsmakher)

equality-not-revenge:

lucifernix:

aestheticstateofmind:

I’m reblogging this again because I love the message behind it and I think it needs to be passed on.

My mother let us choose. My brother and I decided that religion just wasn’t for us. She reacted neutrally and we were not baptised, nor did we make our first holy communion.My sister chose religion. She woke my mum up every Said “its time to go to church”. She was baptised at 8 years old when she was able to do it for herself, read the relevant parts herself, and knew the choices she was making rather than it being made for her. And she was so happy. Religion should be a choice, and one that you are fully consenting and happy to make.She’s now 12 and she still has the cross that was a gift at her baptism above her bed, and still reads her little bible from time to time. She doesn’t attend church any more, because she doesn’t feel that church is necessary to have a god. I am an atheist, as I have stated. But I’m here for her if she ever wants to talk to me about her religion and all things associated.That is how religion should be. For everyone.

This is such a beautiful message.

equality-not-revenge:

lucifernix:

aestheticstateofmind:

I’m reblogging this again because I love the message behind it and I think it needs to be passed on.

My mother let us choose. My brother and I decided that religion just wasn’t for us. She reacted neutrally and we were not baptised, nor did we make our first holy communion.

My sister chose religion. She woke my mum up every Said “its time to go to church”. She was baptised at 8 years old when she was able to do it for herself, read the relevant parts herself, and knew the choices she was making rather than it being made for her. And she was so happy. Religion should be a choice, and one that you are fully consenting and happy to make.

She’s now 12 and she still has the cross that was a gift at her baptism above her bed, and still reads her little bible from time to time. She doesn’t attend church any more, because she doesn’t feel that church is necessary to have a god.

I am an atheist, as I have stated. But I’m here for her if she ever wants to talk to me about her religion and all things associated.

That is how religion should be. For everyone.

This is such a beautiful message.

(Source: gypsymoonsister, via wongtongadventures)


I’m sitting here thinking of all the things I wanted to apologize to you for. All the pain we caused each other. Everything I put on you. Everything I needed you to be or needed you to say. I’m sorry for that. I’ll always love you because we grew up together. You helped make me who I am. I just wanted you to know, there will be a piece of you in me always. And I’m grateful for that. Whatever someone you become and wherever you are in the world, I’m sending you love. You’re my friend to the end. — Her, dir. Spike Jonze

I’m sitting here thinking of all the things I wanted to apologize to you for. All the pain we caused each other. Everything I put on you. Everything I needed you to be or needed you to say. I’m sorry for that. I’ll always love you because we grew up together. You helped make me who I am. I just wanted you to know, there will be a piece of you in me always. And I’m grateful for that. Whatever someone you become and wherever you are in the world, I’m sending you love. You’re my friend to the end. — Her, dir. Spike Jonze

(Source: everyonestop, via heartthr0bbstark)

Remembering that you are going to die one day is the best way to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. Follow your heart.

—Steve Jobs (via zhouetic)

(via oxblood)

westwingman:

-You make it sound like I’m the enemy!
-I am beginning to think that you and your straight world are our enemy! I am FURIOUS with you! And every GODDAMN DOCTOR who made me feel it was sick to love a man!  I am trying to understand why NOBODY. GIVES A SHIT. THAT WE’RE DYING!  Five million dollars for a house and we can’t get twenty-seven cents from the city!? I know forty-three guys who’ve died and you say it’s my cause?  Not yours?! You still think I’m sick!  I simply cannot allow it for one single second longer! I will not speak to you again until you accept me as your equal!  Your HEALTHY  equal! YOUR BROTHER! 

The Normal Heart is about how things were thirty years ago and yet while watching it, I broke down during this scene more than any other. Because it’s been thirty yearsand this is stillthe status quo. This is stillhow so many people are treated, this is stillhow so many people treat the LGBTQA+ community. It’s sickening, it’s horrifying, and it’s saddening.

I don’t know how many of you know, but the reason Ryan Murphy, Mark Ruffalo, and the countless others behind it turned this play into a film is because they were afraid that people were forgetting. That people were so uncomfortable talking about AIDS still, and that we were forgetting the pain and the struggle the community went through to get to where it is today. They specifically choseHBO because of its young audience. They wanted OUR generation to know this story. They did this to teach our generation about AIDS and the struggles of the gay community, BECAUSE NOBODY ELSE WAS.

But the thing that stuck with me more than anything, and the thing I hope you all take away from this film, is that despite the amount of time that has passed, things are still bad.  We are still so persecuted, we are still so unwanted, we are still thought of by so many as sick and wrong and sinful. Things are still bad.This film is about fighting. Fighting for yourself, your friends, and what you believe in. I’m here to tell you we’re not even close to done fighting. And this world won’t change unless you stand up and fight too.

(Source: stevestark, via avisoppugno)